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Tahona Llinás
​Yauco

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The origin of this firm goes back to 1870 when Spanish immigrant from Mallorca Pedro Llinás Bisbal established a store in Barrio Guayo of Adjuntas.  Pedro died single with no children in 1875 at the age of 42 leaving his inheritance to his mother Francisca Bisbal and his nephew Gabriel Llinás Oliver  (1862-1927), both living in Mallorca at the time.  Gabriel emmigrated to Puerto Rico in 1876 to work with Guillermo Bernat Oliver (1854-1920) who had lived on the island since 1869.  The Bernat and Llinás families were related, Guillermo Bernat Oliver and Gabriel Llinas Oliver were 1st cousins, in addition, Guillermo Bernat Oliver was married to Francisca Llinás Oliver, Guillermo's sister and his 1st cousin as well.  

In 1878 the assets left by Pedro Llinás Bisbal, which included Hacienda San Pedro in Barrio Guayo of Adjuntas, passed on to the partnership G. Bernat & Co., established in in 1878 by cousins Guillermo Bernat Oliver as general partner and Gabriel Llinás Oliver as limited partner due to his young age.   In 1886 they established a mercantile operation in Yauco and brought Gabriel's brother Jorge Llinás Oliver (1868-1920) from Spain to join the firm.  In 1890 Jaime Castañer Garau (1871-1959), who was not related to the owners of Hacienda Castañer , was brought in from Mallorca to run the firm's agricultural operation.

In 1893 G. Bernat & Co. moved to the building pictured below, located in the outskirts of the city of Yauco on the road to Lares & Maricao where many of the coffee haciendas were located.  The ground level was used as office and warehouse and the upper level as residence. Between 1905 and 1908 a two story machine house which included a "Tahona" or mill was built behind the warehouse to process coffee grown at their different haciendas and bought from other growers.  With this integration, G Bernat & Co. became one of the major coffee exporters on the island.  

Guillermo Bernat retired in 1913 when the firm G. Llinás & Co. was established to succeed G. Bernat & Co. with Jaime Castañer Garau and Gabriel Llinás Oliver as general partners and Guillermo Bernat Oliver, Jorge Llinas Oliver and Gabriel Llinás Oliver son-in law Antonio Oliver Delgado (1886-1922) as limited partners.  The WWI years, many farmers lost their plantations to creditors, as a result G. Llinás & Co. acquired several coffee haciendas including La Vega (212 cuerdas renamed Iberia upon acquisition), Collado (111 cuerdas), Delfina (600 cuerdas), Josefa (207 cuerdas) and Candelaria (300 cuerdas).  In the 1930s, the 640 cuerdas Hacienda Mogotes which was known for the excellent quality of its coffee, was acquired from the Pieraldi family .

In a 1918 report to the US Congress prepared by the Government of PR listing all real estate holdings in excess of 500 acres used for agricultural purposes and held directly or indirectly by corporations, partnerships or individuals.  G. Llinás & Co. is listed with Guillermo Bernat Oliver, Gabriel Llinás Oliver, Jorge Llinás Oliver, Jaime Castañer Garau and Antonio Oliver Delgado as members owning land in the municipalities of Adjuntas, Yauco, Lares, Maricao and Utuado.

In the 1920s and early 1930s Gabriel Llinás Oliver nephews Jorge and José Llinás Morrell  and his grandson Salvador Oliver Llinás joined the firm which contribution proved very valuable in 1928 when the whole coffee industry in Puerto Rico was devastated by Hurricane San Felipe . In 1936 Hacienda San Pedro was sold, the hacienda's manor house became what is know as "el hospital viejo" in the township of Castañer.

Later on with the coffee in decline, G. Llinás & Co. expanded its operations to Tobacco, Corn, Cocoa and Sugar.  Today we could not find the firm G. Llinás & Co. or related registed as active with the Puerto Rico Department of State.  The structure that used to be the warehouse and residence is now a museum and library.  The structure that used to be the machine house has since been demolished.

The pictures below are part of a 1987 study made by Archeologist Luis Pumarada O'Neill.  Source: Puerto Rico State Historic Preservation Office.
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